Fixed minor memory leak.
[privoxy.git] / forward
1 #       Forwarding specification for Internet Junkbuster 2.0
2 #
3 # Copyright 1997-8 Junkbusters Corp.  For distribution, modification and use
4 # under the GNU General Public License. These files come with NO WARRANTY.
5 # See http://www.junkbusters.com/ht/en/gpl.html or README file for details.
6
7 # For this file to have any effect, the line beginning "forwardfile" must
8 # be commented in, with the name of this file following the word "forwardfile"
9
10 #
11 # This feature allows routing of HTTP requests via multiple proxies.
12 # It can be used to better protect privacy and confidentiality when
13 # accessing specific domains by routing requests to those domains
14 # to a special purpose filtering proxy such as lpwa.com
15 #
16 # It can also be used in an environment with multiple networks to route
17 # requests via multiple gateways allowing transparent access to multiple
18 # networks without having to modify browser configurations.
19 #
20 # Also specified here are special gateway protocols such as SOCKS.
21
22 # The syntax of each line is
23 #
24 # target_domain[:port][/path]   forwarding_domain[:port]        gateway_type    gateway_domain[:port]
25 #
26
27 # A '.' in the forwarding domain/port means that requests made to the
28 # target domain are not forwarded but are made directly by the proxy
29 # (though the proxy may still use a gateway to contact the server)
30 #
31 # Lines are checked in turn, and the last match wins.
32 #
33 # There is an implicit line equivalent to the following, which specifies that
34 # anything not finding a match on the list is to go out without forwarding
35 # or gateway protocol; like so:
36 #
37 # *     .       .       .       # implicit
38
39 # In the following common configuration, everything goes to Lucent's LPWA,
40 # except SSL on port 443 (which it doesn't handle)
41 # *             lpwa.com:8000   .       .
42 # :443          .               .       .
43
44 # See the FAQ for instructions on how to automate the login procedure for LPWA.
45 # Some users have reported difficulties related to LPWA's use of . as the
46 # last element of the domain, and have said that this can be fixed with this:
47 # lpwa.   lpwa.com:8000   .       .
48
49 # In this fictitious example, everything goes via an ISP's caching proxy,
50 # except requests to that ISP:
51 #
52 # *             caching.myisp.net:8000  .       .
53 # myisp.net     .                       .       .
54
55 # For the @home network, we're told the forwarding configuration is this:
56 # *       proxy:8080      .       .
57 # Also, we're told they insist on getting cookies and Javascript, so you need
58 # to add home.com to the cookie file. We consider Javascript a security risk;
59 # see our page on cookies. Java need not be enabled.
60
61 # In this example direct connections are made to all "internal" domains,
62 # but everything else goes through Lucent's LPWA by way of the company's
63 # SOCKS gateway to the Internet.
64 #
65 # *                     lpwa.com:8000   socks   argyle.my_company.com:1080
66 # my_company.com        .               .       .
67
68 # This is how you could set up a site that always uses SOCKS but no forwarders
69 #
70 # *                     .               socks   knee.my_company.com:1080
71
72 # An advanced example for network administrators.
73 #
74 # If you have links to multiple ISPs that provide various special
75 #content to their subscribers, you can configure forwarding to pass
76 # requests to the specific host that's connected to that ISP
77 # so that everybody can see
78 # all of the content on all of the ISPs.
79 #
80 # This is tricky, but here's a sample:
81
82 # host-a has a PPP connection to isp-a.com
83 # host-b has a PPP connection to isp-b.com
84
85 # host-a can run an Internet Junkbuster proxy with forwarding like this:
86 #
87 # /             .               .       .
88 # isp-b.com     host-b:8000     .       .
89 #
90 # host-b can run an Internet Junkbuster proxy with forwarding like this:
91 # /             .               .       .
92 # isp-a.com     host-a:8000     .       .
93 #
94 # Now, *anyone* on the Internet (including users on host-a and host-b)
95 # can set their browser's proxy to *either* host-a or host-b and
96 # be able to browse the content on isp-a or isp-b.
97